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Q: What is the format of the online class?

A: Participants do weekly course work online. There are six themed units, including a religious unit. Live conferencing occurs at the end of each unit.

Q: How much time does the class require per week?

A: Students spend 3-5 hours per week on vocabulary and written responses. Most time is spent learning/reviewing vocabulary, viewing video clips with signs and printed words.

Q: When is the class offered?

A: The MLC course for ASL online class is offered every spring semester. 

Q: What about time commitment during Lent?

A: No assignments/activities are due on Wednesdays or Thursdays. One unit is stretched out for a longer time during the Lenten season.

Q: How much computer knowledge is necessary?

A: The student needs to have access to e-mail. Upon registration, students experiencing an online class for the first time may view an orientation video showing how to access/use MLC’s Moodle and Google Hangouts video conferencing. High-speed internet connection is necessary for video conferencing.

Q: Do I need to be available for a LIVE class?

A: No; all work is done online, on your own with the deadline. LIVE conferencing between several students and the instructor happens at the end of each unit to review vocabulary words. Several 1-hour sessions (Central Time Zone) are available; the student picks what fits one’s schedule. Students also connect with other classmates to become more comfortable signing. One-on-one time with the instructor may be requested.

Q: How is assessment done?

A:  First assessment is video conferencing both receptive and expressive with the instructor. Second assessment is solo assessment. Participating the video conferencing is giving you the preview the similar format what to expect for the testing to take a test on their own time. The format may vary. It can be receptive and/or expressive.

Q: Helpful tips from former students?

A: Practice, practice, practice. Learning sign language is fun. Reviewing vocabulary words, new and old, numerous times, is necessary. Practice with a partner from the class. Don’t become stressed about signing things correctly; most students in the class are learning something new. You will also learn about Deaf Culture and etiquette between Deaf and hearing people. Your interest in sign will be piqued; you may want to learn more sign language later and/or have contact with Deaf people.

STUDENTS’ COMMENTS ABOUT AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

  1. I have a deeper understanding of the (Deaf) culture, needs, and resources available.
  2. By helping me study sign language, you have opened a door for me; a door to another culture.